Library

Others

  • The word anesthesia comes from the Greek meaning "lack of sensation". Anesthesia is accomplished by administering drugs that depress nerve function. With general anesthesia, the patient is made unconscious for a short period. During this unconscious state, there is muscular relaxation and a complete loss of pain sensation.

  • Certain species of a common fungus called Aspergillus can infect the nasal cavity and sinuses of cats and can even become disseminated to different areas of the body. Cats affected by exposure to this fungus are usually immunosuppressed. Diagnosis of either form, the nasal form or disseminated form, can be difficult, usually requiring X-rays or more advanced imaging such as MRI or CT, as well as tissue biopsies and culture. Treatment of the nasal form involves topical administration of an antifungal agent while the cat is under general anesthesia, although oral antifungals such as itraconazole and posaconazole may also be used. Prognosis is fair to good. Treatment of the disseminated form is more difficult requiring additional antifungals, such as amphotericin b that can be harmful to the kidneys.

  • Children often have very close relationships with pets, and especially with cats. The loss of a pet cat is inevitable and may be the child’s first experience of death, but there are ways for parents and others to help the child cope with it. It starts with talking with your child about death truthfully and in an age-appropriate manner. It is important for children to have the opportunity to say goodbye. Children grieve just as intensely as adults do, but often have different ways of expressing their grief. As a parent, you can support your child in many ways. You can maintain routines in work and play, find ways to honor and remember your cat, and read books on pet loss with your child. It is important to enlist others to offer support as well. Eventually you may consider a new adoption. Remember, the experience of loss is different for everyone, even children. Each child will grieve their cat in their own unique way and at their own pace. With care and support, your child can grow through the grief and heal.

  • Hospitals providing curbside care have restructured their practice to avoid the need for clients to enter the lobby and exam rooms. This is designed to promote physical (social) distancing and reduce the spread of COVID-19. Curbside care offers a number of benefits for you and your pet. By eliminating the need for you to enter the hospital, potential COVID-19 outbreaks are reduced. The veterinary team is protected under a curbside care model, and in turn, so is your pet. Even in curbside care, you will have an opportunity to speak with your veterinarian in order to discuss findings and recommendations. To help the curbside appointment go smoothly, bring a written list of concerns or fill in any forms your practice has sent to you prior to the appointment. Curbside care truly is in the best interests of you and your pet.

  • An E-collar or cone may be needed after your cat has surgery or if she has a wound. Your cat should wear the E-collar following the directions provided by your veterinarian. You may need to make a few adjustments in your home to ensure your cat does not get stuck in confined spaces. Also, you may need to adjust her feeding station to assist with her eating habits.

  • Fever is a term that refers to an elevated body temperature. The normal body temperature range for cats is between 100.5°F and 102.5°F (38.1°C to 39.2°C). To be classified as a fever of unknown origin (FUO), the body temperature must be above 103.5°F (39.7°C) on at least four occasions over a fourteen-day period, accompanied by an illness of at least fourteen days' duration without an obvious cause.

  • Genetic testing can provide valuable information about your pet; not only to determine breed heritage, but also to bring awareness of predisposed or hereditary medical conditions. This can allow for earlier detection and care to lessen the impact of a condition or possibly prevent it entirely.

  • Giardiasis is an intestinal infection of man and animals cased by a microscopic protozoan parasite Giardia duodenalis. Giardia is a simple one-celled parasitic species; it is not a "worm", bacteria, or virus. Giardiasis can be an important cause of diarrhea in animals and humans. However, many cats are infected without developing clinical signs or the diarrhea is treated as 'non-specific'.

  • We celebrate our pets! We have cake on their birthdays. We wrap presents for them at Christmas. We buy them special toys when they are sick. When they pass on, we are sad, but isn't it fitting to celebrate one more time?

  • Mothballs are solid pesticides that slowly release a vapor to kill and repel moths, their larvae, and other insects from stored clothing and fabric. Mothballs are sometimes also used to repel snakes, mice, and other animals, although this use is not recommended and can be harmful to pets, children, and the environment.



Cat Info

We are committed to providing you with the latest in cat health information. This information is for educational purposes only to help you understand your cat’s healthcare needs. Please contact us directly for specific concerns about your cat.



Click Here





Services

At Albuquerque Cat Clinic, we believe that the bond between cats and their caretakers is extremely special. We also believe that protecting and preserving our feline patients’ health, both physical and mental, is essential to the continuance of this bond.



Click Here





Feline Wellness

We strive to continually exceed our clients’ expectations in the care and treatment of their feline companions. We work diligently to provide a quiet, relaxing environment and excellent customer service in order to create an experience that is as pleasant as possible.



Click Here